Use of coriander in cooking- why is it essential?

Use of coriander in cooking- why is it essential?
22 May, 2018

Coriander is a pretty herbaceous plant with thin, light green leaves, although the whole plant is edible (leaves, seeds, roots and stems), it is mainly the dried fruits (seeds) and leaves that are used as a spice.

Coriander is found in kitchens all over the world, and in many spice blends, because its subtlety means that it goes perfectly with other herbs.

The plant is one of the most common aromatic herbs in the world, because it acclimates very easily. It has a very strong odour, sometimes even unpleasant. The seeds and leaves are very different, in terms of use or flavour.

How to use coriander in cooking? In what form coriander is used?

Coriander is used in seeds, powder, or leaves:

- Whole seeds: will offer a more subtle and diffuse aroma, and are to be preferred for all dishes in sauce and preparation where it is necessary to infuse the spice.

- Coriander powder: will give intense aromas, while remaining discreet, because the powder will mix with food.

- Coriander leaves: their fragrance is particular, they are used when they are recommended.

Where to use coriander seed and powder?

The use of coriander, in the form of seed or power, is universal and extends to all dishes, salty or sweet.

It is a spice to sprinkle without hesitation on fish, grilled meats, potatoes, soups, rice, eggplants, salads (it is also part of the spice mix for salad), raw vegetables, seafood, shrimp, etc.

It is advisable to add it when cooking legumes such as lentils, dried beans and other legumes, because in addition to flavouring them, it helps facilitate digestion.

Its sweet scent is perfect to enhance the taste of vegetarian as well non-vegetarian dishes. If you’re going to prepare chhole, then we suggest you to choose the chhole masala offered by Avon Agro made with best ingredients that will give you dish a new taste and a lovely aroma.

Traditionally, it is a spice that is widely used in Indian and Near Eastern cuisines. In India, coriander seeds are usually roasted before use.

The spice is used alone, but most often associated with other condiments in Indian spice blends also known as Madras curry or Garam masala. It is, along with turmeric and ginger, one of the most common spices in typical Indian cuisine, essential for making curry pastes.

It is one of the spices that mixes best with other spices, which is why it is found in most blends, if you are trying to play the alchemist, do not hesitate to use it!

There is no contraindication for its use, which ranges from starter to dessert (for example in gingerbread, cookies or cake). You can even put it in your teas and infusion, it will provide its fragrance with discretion. If you like its sweet flavour, its use will extend to your entire kitchen!

The coriander powder acts on the entire digestive system with its stomachic and carminative properties, which facilitates the expulsion of intestinal gases. Thus, the spice is effective in relieving aerophagia concerns about bloating, colic and intestinal spasms.

Use of coriander powder in your food is also recommended to fight against anxiety and fatigue, thanks to its tonic and stimulating properties.